Mother’s Day Dessert – Safe for the Whole Family

When I saw the cover of the May 2016 Better Homes and Gardens® magazine, I was inspired!

Mother’s day is right around the corner and what better idea than to make a delicious modified dessert for the mom who’s having trouble swallowing but that the whole family can share and enjoy.

The recipe in the magazine is for “Showstopping Meringue Desserts”. Crispy, marshmallow-y meringues are unsafe to consume for someone on a puree diet because they consist of several different textures and dissolve on the tongue, making it impossible to control the swallow. Add whole fruit and the original recipe is definitely off the list of “okay” foods if you are having trouble swallowing.

So I created a recipe that is every bit as beautiful and delicious.

The whole family can eat this and not feel like they are being cheated…just ask my girlfriends who ate these for dessert at our “girls’ lunch” yesterday!

This recipe is easy to make ahead and scale up or down, as needed.

  • 1 – 8 oz. brick Cream Cheese, softened
  • ½ cup Powdered Sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract
  • 1 – 8 oz. container Whipped Topping, thawed
  • 1 jar Lemon Curd
  • Seedless Blackberry Jam
  • Blueberry Syrup
  • Mint for garnish, optional

In a large bowl, mix cream cheese with a mixer until smooth. Add powdered sugar and vanilla and beat until smooth. Fold in whipped topping.

Drop rounded half cup portions on a parchment lined sheet pan that will fit in your freezer. Form a well in each mound, making a shell, and freeze for at least 4 hours or overnight.

When you are ready to serve, peel the frozen shells off the parchment and place on individual plates or on a platter. Place the shells in the refrigerator for 20 minutes or allow them to sit at room temperature for about 10 minute so they can soften.

Add 1 1/2 tablespoons of lemon curd to each shell and top with small dollops of seedless blackberry jam and drizzle with blueberry syrup. Serve and enjoy!

Serves 8

The shells can be made ahead up to a month ahead, just freeze them until they are firm before you cover them with plastic wrap

.

If you are concerned about carbohydrates and fat, you can easily substitute Neufchatel cheese and “lite” whipped topping.

Nutritional Info each: 325 calories; 17.25 gm fat; 40 gm carbohydrates; 135 mg sodium; 0.33 gm protein


Raising Awareness for National Dysphagia Awareness Month

June is Nationa Dysphagia Awareness Month so I made this “shout-out” to Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb so they can help us raise awareness. I hope this helps you and other who struggle with dysphagia and swallowing disorders. Enjoy!


Tips for Thickening Nutritional Supplements

If you are on thickened liquids, how can you safely drink pre-made nutritional shakes like Boost and Ensure? This video will help answer your questions.


NEW Dysphagia Support Group in the Greater Phoenix Area

On Friday, March 11, from 3:00 pm to 5;00 pm, the National Foundation of Swallowing Disorders is kicking-off a support group for those with swallowing disorders.

Future meetings are scheduled for the second Friday of the month from 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm.

Morningstar Senior Living has graciously offered to host our meetings. Morningstar is located at 21432 N 75th Avenue, Glendale, AZ 85305. http://www.morningstarseniorliving.com/communities/morningstar-at-arrowhead/

As this is our first meeting, this will be a planning meeting where we discuss the needs of the community.  Future topics will include:

  1. Feeding tube management
  2. Thickening products and thickening procedures
  3. Oral Care
  4. National Dysphagia Diet
  5. Compensatory swallowing techniques
  6. Social/emotional ramifications of dysphagia
  7. Optimizing reflux management
  8. New advances in Dysphagia Management
  9. Role of nutrition in maximizing swallowing function
  10. Dysphagia, from the eyes of the caregiver
  11. Free water protocol
  12. Understanding Aspiration Pneumonia
  13. Long term effects of radiation therapy
  14. Living with Xerostomia
  15. Naturally thickened liquids. Naturally pureed foods
  16. Customizing dysphagia therapy
  17. Understanding normal swallowing function
  18. Stroke and Dysphagia
  19. Voice and Swallowing…How are they connected?
  20. Dysphagia Diet Recipes
  21. Maximizing outcomes through the interdisciplinary team approach
  22. How are swallowing problems diagnosed

This swallowing disorder support group is open to patients, caregivers, clinicians and anyone who has questions and needs support and resources to live their best lives.

If you need more information or plan to attend, please email Laura Michael at: Laura@dysphagiasupplies.com.SSSC 2016 booth

Hope to see you there!


“How to Puree Just About Everything” – A How-To Video

Though I haven’t posted recently, I have been busy.

I am in the process of filming cooking lessons on the techniques neccessary to puree almost every food. There will be five lessons in all.

The cooking lessons will be on a DVD that will be included in the purchase of my care manual “Making Every Bite Count”. Because this information is essential to living on a puree diet, I hope to make all the full length videos available to view online for a small fee.

Through these cooking lessons, I will show you how to modify the foods you love so you can still eat them if you are on a puree diet.

First up: Meat

Pureeing meat can be a real challenge! Cooked meats can be hard to puree because meat protein form tight bundles that need can be difficult to chew, let alone puree. When pureeing meat, keep in mind that:

  1. you need to start-out with cooked meat
  2. meats that are easier to chew will also be easier to puree
  3. you’ll need broth or other cooking liquid
  4. you’ll need an instant food thickener to bind the puree into a cohesive mass for safe swallowing
  5. purees don’t have to be soupy
  6. purees can taste great!

This video is just a snap-shot of the full video, so take a look and get some ideas!


June is National Dysphagia Awareness Month


Perfectly Safe Popsicles

If you’ve been prescribed thickened liquids and you miss eating ice cream and other frozen treats, this video will help you

 


Want to make bread, cakes and baked goods safer for those with a swallowing problem? Watch this video!


2015 is the Year of the Caregiver

Recently, I worked with a 93 year-old male client who told me that he used to abide by “happy wife, happy life” but now that he has lost his wife after seventy years of marriage, he abides by “happy caregiver, happy life”.

So true: if the care-giver isn’t happy and healthy, then the cared-for can suffer.

Whether you are a family member taking care of a parent (or child) or a professional caregiver, it is vital that you stay healthy, strong and resourceful.

One key to staying healthy is to make time for physical activity. Notice I didn’t say “exercise”. Activities like working in the garden, walking through the neighborhood or the mall, or chasing your dog around the backyard, or dancing to your favorite music all qualify as physical activity. Physical activity not only burns calories and gets your blood flowing, helps you do your “mental laundry” and work-off stress. If you are caring for someone else, you are experiencing stress, whether you recognize it or not.

Another key to good health is eating foods that help you maintain your activity level and core health. The good news is that those foods that help you be you maximize your health are delicious, don’t take a whole lot of preparation and we readily available.

So what foods should you make sure to get onto your plate at each meal every day? Think color. Naturally colorful foods are full of antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. What foods are naturally colorful? Fruits and vegetables! Fortunately, most grocery store produce sections are stocked with packaged, cleaned lettuce mixes, and pre-cut fruits and vegetables. During the off-season, look beyond the produce department to the freezer section for frozen berries, pineapple and mango. Often, frozen fruits and vegetables have higher vitamin content than those found in the produce department because they are harvested and processed at the peak of ripeness, preserving the nutrients.

Managing stress is another key component to staying healthy. Exercising that part of you that clears your mind and frees you from the everyday toil will help dissipate stress. What is it that you love to do? Make time for it. Spend unstructured time with friends. See a movie. Clean-out a drawer. Play cards with your pals. Walk nine holes. Make time for rest and re-creation.

Don’t let your sleep suffer. Turn-off the television, the iPad, computer or whatever screen you are hooked on, at least an hour before bedtime. The human brain needs an hour to recover from the screen before it can shut-off for a sound sleep. Physical activity early in the day can help you sleep soundly. A leisurely walk after dinner can be relaxing. Avoid alcohol right before bedtime. A drink may help you get to sleep but it can make it difficult to get back to sleep if you are awakened in the night.

Humans need to touch and be touched so find a way to use your hands for pleasure. Pet an animal. Knit, crochet or do some form of needlework. Visit a fabric store and caress the beautiful, colorful, textural fabrics. Or pamper yourself and have your hair shampooed and blown dry. Get a pedicure. Be in the moment and find a way to enjoy the feel of the textures around you.

It is just important to stay connected with your friends and community. It is all too easy to get caught-up in the role of caregiver and forget about maintaining your friendships. When you maintain your friendships, you are taking time to maintain yourself.

Every time I speak with a client or caregiver, I ask them what they did for themselves that day. Often, the first time I ask the response is “nothing” but after we talk about how important it is that they take care of themselves, the next time I ask they usually have something to share.

Take time for yourself so you can better take care of others.

M, D, L 2006 cropped


Thoughts on “Being Mortal”

being mortal

Atul Gawande’s marvelous book “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End”, is a must-read for anyone who plans to age in the USA. Dr. Atul Gawande is a surgeon, a professor at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health, a writer for the New York Times, and the author of three bestselling non-fiction books on science and public health. He makes difficult subjects interesting and understandable. You don’t have to be a scientist to understand and enjoy his books.

In “Being Mortal”, Dr. Gawande writes eloquently about the history of how we care for our aging population and the importance of retaining the dignity and freedom to be the “authors of our own lives.” In the end, when all else is said and done, that is what matters.

This book has inspired me. This month, I spoke at the Arizona Geriatric Society’s Fall conference. My topic was “Managing Dysphagia Beyond Acute Care”. Once read this book, I reworked my presentation. I made sure to address the joy of eating, the social aspects of sharing a meal and the cultural significance of food. The medical professionals who attended this conference know the science so I shared with them my thoughts on the art and soul of eating.

“Being Mortal” is a call to action for doctors and other medical professionals to expand our responsibilities beyond trying to “fix” what is wrong and embrace the final years of living. This time period should be about living as fully as possible and having the best possible day (week/month/year); it should not be focused on dying.  As we reach advanced age or fight a terminal illness, much of what happens to our bodies can’t be “fixed”. Yes, we can eat right and exercise but there is nothing we can do to stop time.

For many of us, as we age, our ability to swallow can become impaired. Illnesses like oral cancer and dementia can rob us of more than our vitality; they can steal from us our ability to eat and enjoy food. According to the National Institutes of Health, one in six Americans over the age of 60 is having trouble swallowing. In 2013, over ten million Americans had a swallowing assessment.

In “Being Mortal” Dr. Gawande builds the case that “as our time runs down, we all seek comfort in simple pleasures – companionship, everyday routines, the taste of good food, the warmth of sunlight on our faces”. Not being able to eat and drink like everyone else can interrupt our everyday routines, be isolating and can lead to depression. Food and eating is basic to our survival, but is even more important to our quality of life and our joy of living. How we eat and with whom we eat feeds the spirit.

Caring for someone with swallowing problems is about more than the mechanics of feeding. Doing it right is science combined with art. With the right tools, creativity and information, it may be possible for those with swallowing problems to share and enjoy a meal. Diagnoses and food modifications help to sustain the ability to nourish the body but we should acknowledge that we need to feed the soul, as well.