Raising Awareness for National Dysphagia Awareness Month

June is Nationa Dysphagia Awareness Month so I made this “shout-out” to Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb so they can help us raise awareness. I hope this helps you and other who struggle with dysphagia and swallowing disorders. Enjoy!


NEW Dysphagia Support Group in the Greater Phoenix Area

On Friday, March 11, from 3:00 pm to 5;00 pm, the National Foundation of Swallowing Disorders is kicking-off a support group for those with swallowing disorders.

Future meetings are scheduled for the second Friday of the month from 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm.

Morningstar Senior Living has graciously offered to host our meetings. Morningstar is located at 21432 N 75th Avenue, Glendale, AZ 85305. http://www.morningstarseniorliving.com/communities/morningstar-at-arrowhead/

As this is our first meeting, this will be a planning meeting where we discuss the needs of the community.  Future topics will include:

  1. Feeding tube management
  2. Thickening products and thickening procedures
  3. Oral Care
  4. National Dysphagia Diet
  5. Compensatory swallowing techniques
  6. Social/emotional ramifications of dysphagia
  7. Optimizing reflux management
  8. New advances in Dysphagia Management
  9. Role of nutrition in maximizing swallowing function
  10. Dysphagia, from the eyes of the caregiver
  11. Free water protocol
  12. Understanding Aspiration Pneumonia
  13. Long term effects of radiation therapy
  14. Living with Xerostomia
  15. Naturally thickened liquids. Naturally pureed foods
  16. Customizing dysphagia therapy
  17. Understanding normal swallowing function
  18. Stroke and Dysphagia
  19. Voice and Swallowing…How are they connected?
  20. Dysphagia Diet Recipes
  21. Maximizing outcomes through the interdisciplinary team approach
  22. How are swallowing problems diagnosed

This swallowing disorder support group is open to patients, caregivers, clinicians and anyone who has questions and needs support and resources to live their best lives.

If you need more information or plan to attend, please email Laura Michael at: Laura@dysphagiasupplies.com.SSSC 2016 booth

Hope to see you there!

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If you’ve been prescribed thickened liquids and you miss eating ice cream and other frozen treats, this video will help you

 


Thoughts on “Being Mortal”

being mortal

Atul Gawande’s marvelous book “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End”, is a must-read for anyone who plans to age in the USA. Dr. Atul Gawande is a surgeon, a professor at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health, a writer for the New York Times, and the author of three bestselling non-fiction books on science and public health. He makes difficult subjects interesting and understandable. You don’t have to be a scientist to understand and enjoy his books.

In “Being Mortal”, Dr. Gawande writes eloquently about the history of how we care for our aging population and the importance of retaining the dignity and freedom to be the “authors of our own lives.” In the end, when all else is said and done, that is what matters.

This book has inspired me. This month, I spoke at the Arizona Geriatric Society’s Fall conference. My topic was “Managing Dysphagia Beyond Acute Care”. Once read this book, I reworked my presentation. I made sure to address the joy of eating, the social aspects of sharing a meal and the cultural significance of food. The medical professionals who attended this conference know the science so I shared with them my thoughts on the art and soul of eating.

“Being Mortal” is a call to action for doctors and other medical professionals to expand our responsibilities beyond trying to “fix” what is wrong and embrace the final years of living. This time period should be about living as fully as possible and having the best possible day (week/month/year); it should not be focused on dying.  As we reach advanced age or fight a terminal illness, much of what happens to our bodies can’t be “fixed”. Yes, we can eat right and exercise but there is nothing we can do to stop time.

For many of us, as we age, our ability to swallow can become impaired. Illnesses like oral cancer and dementia can rob us of more than our vitality; they can steal from us our ability to eat and enjoy food. According to the National Institutes of Health, one in six Americans over the age of 60 is having trouble swallowing. In 2013, over ten million Americans had a swallowing assessment.

In “Being Mortal” Dr. Gawande builds the case that “as our time runs down, we all seek comfort in simple pleasures – companionship, everyday routines, the taste of good food, the warmth of sunlight on our faces”. Not being able to eat and drink like everyone else can interrupt our everyday routines, be isolating and can lead to depression. Food and eating is basic to our survival, but is even more important to our quality of life and our joy of living. How we eat and with whom we eat feeds the spirit.

Caring for someone with swallowing problems is about more than the mechanics of feeding. Doing it right is science combined with art. With the right tools, creativity and information, it may be possible for those with swallowing problems to share and enjoy a meal. Diagnoses and food modifications help to sustain the ability to nourish the body but we should acknowledge that we need to feed the soul, as well.


What to Expect from a Swallow Consultation

By: Kayla Suarez, MS, SLP-C

When swallowing issues are first noticed at home, the primary care doctor is the generally a patient’s first point of contact. When discussing a swallow problem with the doctor, it is helpful to have the following information prepared, so that you can provide the most powerful description of what is happening during mealtimes. A consult may be placed to a swallowing specialist, such as a speech-language pathologist or an occupational therapist.

During a swallow evaluation, a specialist will ask questions regarding the swallow dysfunction and conduct a brief meal trial to observe the problem in the clinic.  If ordered by a doctor (often at the suggestion of the swallow specialist) an assessment called a Video Swallow Study sometimes called a Modified Barium Swallow may be performed. This involves taking food or liquid mixed with barium, a radio contrast, under fluoroscopy, or a video x-ray machine. This is a non-invasive procedure and usually takes 45 minutes or less.

This assessment is the gold standard of swallowing evaluations because it provides the most information. From this x-ray video, a trained specialist can identify the disruptions in the swallow pattern that are involved in the dysphagia. During this assessment, clinicians can observe to see if any swallow maneuvers are beneficial. It also gives the clinician information to determine what type of swallow exercises would be suited for the patient’s individual dysphagia.

After the assessment has been completed the swallowing specialist will give their impressions of the swallow function to the patient and a copy of the report to the primary doctor. Recommendations regarding the texture, position, and rehabilitative exercises may be offered. Exercises are suggested to help recover or maintain swallowing abilities, not unlike recommendations from a physical therapist. It is important to clarify any questions regarding the exercises or diet modifications with your healthcare provider. The ultimate goal is eating safely and preserving swallow function while keeping mealtime enjoyable.

Kayla Suarez received her MS in Speech-Language Pathology from Mass General Hospital Institute of Health Professions. She has a deep interest in dysphagia and food. You can contact Kayla at kaysuarez@gmail.com or visit her website at dysdine.com.

Dysdine w.forks


Webinar Series for Swallowing Disorder Support

NFOSD Logo 2.1.13

Webinar Series

The National Foundation of Swallowing Disorders is offering a series of patient-centered webinars on the latest research on swallowing disorders. Experts in the field of swallowing disorders such as tongue stem cell research, nutrition, aspiration pneumonia, as they relate to swallowing disorders. If you have a swallowing disorder or are Speech Language Pathologist (SLP), please share this information with them. For more information, visit their website: http://www.swallowingdisorderfoundation.com

 Cost: Free for members. Nominal donation required for non-members.

Webinar #1: July 15, 2014

            Adult Human Tongue Stem Cell Research 

                        Dr. Peter Belafsky

Webinar #2: August 27, 2014

            The Role of Electrical Stimulation in the Treatment of Swallowing Disorders  

                        Dr. Christy Ludlow

Webinar #3: September 30, 2013

            How to Find the Right Professional to Help with a Swallowing Disorder

                       Nancy B. Swigert, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S.

Webinar# 4: November 4, 2014

            Aspiration Pneumonia in Patients with Swallowing Disorders

                        Tiffany Mohr, MA, CCC-SLP

Webinar# 5: December 2, 2014

            I-Pro Swallowing Solutions 

                        Dr. JoAnne Robbins

Webinar #6: January 27, 2015

            Nutrition and Dysphagia

                        Laura Michael, BS

Webinar #7: February 24, 2015

            Degenerative Disease and the Impact on Swallowing

                        Dr. Michelle Ciucci & Dr. Emily Plowman

Webinar #8: April 7, 2015

            Clinical Implications of Swallowing Research

                        Molly Knigge, MS, CCC-SLP

 

The NFOSD is an all-volunteer 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that relies on the generosity of our family, friends, and members to provide the financial support required to carry out our commitment to providing patient hope and improving the quality of life for those suffering from all types of swallowing disorders. We do this by enhancing direct patient support, education, research, and raising public, professional, and governmental awareness. Our mission is to advance the prevention and treatment of swallowing disorders in our lifetime. 


Aids for Daily Living help those struggling to feed themselves

When I speak to dementia support groups, I mention how helpful it can be to use specially adapted eating utensils. Something as simple as a fork with a larger handle can help restore a bit of dignity to someone who is struggling with feeding themselves.

Recently, I was visiting my friend Yolanda Romero-Alemany in her medical supply store and I saw the helpful eating/feeding items she stocks. Yolanda is a great resource for medical equipment and supplies so I asked her to write this guest blog:

Ever wonder why restaurants’ menus and interiors often are red?  Studies have shown that the color red stimulates the appetite. 

How does this relate to people eating independently, especially those with Alzheimer’s or Dementia?  Red is the color easiest to perceive for Alzheimer’s and Dementia patients which makes it great for tableware.  Many Alzheimer’s patients do not eat enough due to lack of hand-eye coordination with silverware or not being able to distinguish the food from the serving bowl/dish.  At Scottsdale Medical Equipment & Supplies, we carry the Power of Red line of utensils, bowls, and cups by Essential Medical.  The red dish and bowl have nonslip bottoms which hold it in place while eating and the great red color provides contrast between the food and dish.  The forks and spoons have large handles to make it easier to grip and can actually bend so the motion to scoop something up from a bowl to the mouth is easier.  The Power of Red line also includes a cup with a nose cutout so people don’t have to tilt their heads back to drink.   These items range in price from $18-$45.

Scottsdale Medical Equipment & Supplies stocks other Aids to Daily Living products carried at our store in Scottsdale, on the NW corner of Loop 101 and Shea Blvd. We stock many eating/feeding tools which make meal time more enjoyable for everyone. 

If you are in the area, stop by our store is at 8752 E. Shea Blvd, Scottsdale, AZ 85260 and “Let our Family Take Care of Your Family”.

 

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Nourishing Independence with Mom’s Meals

Recently, I worked with a client who had just returned home after six weeks in hospital and rehab. “Irene” had been a vital, active 78 year-old woman before her stroke. More than anything, Irene and her husband “Bob” want to get their lives back to normal.

Since Irene has arrived home, Bob has been working overtime managing all of the activities that come with recovery from stroke including: scheduling doctor’s appointments then going to the appointments, ordering and receiving a hospital bed and wheel chair, juggling therapy visits, picking-up prescriptions, making the house wheel chair friendly and opening all the mail that accumulates while you are occupied away from home, just to name a few.

Bob asked me to help him learn how to cook for and feed Irene. Before the stroke, cooking was Irene’s job in the family but Bob will do anything it takes to care for his wife, including learning how to cook at 78 years-old! Being a bit overwhelmed, Bob has no time to cook for himself, let alone cook and then puree meals for Irene. I’m glad that there are foods like Mom’s Meals – Purees to recommend to him.

Mom’s Meals is an online supplier fresh-cooked, ready-made refrigerated pureed meals. Each meal has a main dish, vegetable and dessert. Their menu consists of comfort foods like:

  • Scrambled Eggs with Brown Sugar Pork Loin Bacon, Bread and Applesauce
  • Roast Beef with Gravy, Mashed Potatoes, Brown Sugar Glazed Carrots, Vanilla Pudding and Applesauce
  • Pork with BBQ Sauce, Cheese Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, Fruit and Chocolate Pudding
  • Roasted White-meat Chicken with Gravy, Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans and Carrots, Fruit and Vanilla Pudding
  • Pasta with Marinara Sauce and Broccoli, Blueberry Applesauce and Pudding

You order online (or by phone) and Mom’s Meals ships directly to your home. The meals have a 14 day shelf life and are easily reheated in the microwave.

I sampled four meals and I found them delicious and hearty. At between 600 and 700 calories per meal, they are ideal for helping to rebuild your strength. With four breakfast menus and eight lunch/dinner choices, you have some ability to eat a variety of foods. If you like home-cooking, Mom’s Meals purees will appeal to you, as they did to Irene and Bob.

Each full puree meal is $7.49 plus shipping. Shipping is $14.95 regardless of the size of your order.

And if you are too busy to cook, like Bob, check-out their regular meals, as well!

To order from Mom’s Meals purees visit their website: http://www.momsmeals.com/independent-at-home/pureed-menu/.

If you need advice, please contact me: laura@dysphagiasupplies.com or 480-266-5622.

moms meals


Finally, a new Care Manual!

A care manual for living with swallowing problems.

A care manual for living with swallowing problems.

I’ve developed a tool for living with a diagnosis of dysphagia, it is called:

“Making Every Bite Count”

Cooking for Someone with a Swallowing Problem

This care manual helps you how to manage your condition and

keeps your information and research organized

It includes:

• Basic nutrition and how to make every bite count for someone who is having trouble getting enough to eat and drink by mouth.

• How to incorporate the standards of the National Dysphagia Diet into your normal eating habits.

• “How to Puree Just About Everything” – a cookbook with simple techniques on how to modify common, everyday foods.

• Delicious, easy recipes that the whole family can enjoy.

• Updated lists of regular, pre-made modified foods found in most grocery stores.

• Reviews of protein-calorie enhancers, specialty nutritional products, kitchen equipment and more!

• A swallowing screening tool.

• Pre-punched pages for monthly updates.

• Pockets and sleeves for keeping your paperwork and doctors’ orders in one place.

The purchase of this care manual also includes a monthly email update with seasonal recipes, advice, new product introductions and the latest information on webinars and support groups for living with or caring for someone with swallowing problems.

For more information or to order this care manual, please visit my website: http://www.dysphagiasolutions.com


The Perfect Puree Day by Laura Michael

Dysphagia Cafe

Getting proper nutrition can be difficult when you have trouble swallowing. The inability to eat the right foods safely can lead to malnutrition. Maintaining proper nutritional intake is a key to overall good health and a high quality of life1. The National Dysphagia Diet2 defined the standard of what pureed food is, but offers little information on how to incorporate pureed foods into an active lifestyle.

The Challenge: Is it possible to eat healthy and well on a puree diet without using your blender or food processor? Can you still eat out? Yes! Let’s answer that challenge by offering breakfast, lunch, and dinner options for those on a modified diet.

Breakfast. Pre-made smoothies, available in the freezer case at most grocery stores, are a good option. Custom-made smoothies can be found at Whole Foods®, Einstein Bros.®, McDonalds®, Starbucks® or any juice bar. Smoothies that contain…

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